Number Writer 2.0

To download, please see the download page.
For the previous version, see Number Writer 1.1.

This is a bigger update than the last one. Here are the changes:
1. I’ve added another 5 language options (for a total of 13): Korean, Latvian, Portuguese (Brazilian), Portuguese (European), and Spanish.
2. The answers section is now selectable (but not editable) and scrollable (the text won’t go unreachably out of view again).
3. Korean, Mandarin, and Russian all still have their transliterations, but these are now all displayed along with their respective original texts.
4. I’ve also fixed some more minor bugs.

[Note]
It’s possible that Korean and Mandarin will be displayed as little rectangles. This means that you do not have Unicode (UTF-8) encoding installed. UTF-8 is a very common encoding system for all computers, but if yours doesn’t have it, you can read about it on Wikipedia or its official website.
To install a new font on Windows, upload the TrueType font (.ttf) file to the Fonts folder (the default should be something like C:\WINDOWS\Fonts).
To install a new font on Mac OS X, upload the binary font (.bin) file to the Fonts folder (the default should be something like /Library/Fonts).

The new total amount of numbers is now 3,200,032,000,000,016 (3 quadrillion 200 trillion 32 billion and 16) values. Again, if you catch a mistake somewhere, please let me know! 🙂 I hope there aren’t any wrong numbers anywhere!

For the previous version, see Number Writer 1.1.
To download, please see the download page. I hope you enjoy the updates! More languages are coming soon!

Number Writer 1.1

To download, please see the download page.
For the next version, see Number Writer 2.0. For the previous version, see Number Writer 1.0.

This is the first update. I’ve made a few useful changes:
1. I’ve added 3 language options (for a total of 8 now): Mandarin (Traditional), Mandarin (Simplified), and Russian.
2. Mandarin and Russian both have their respective transliterations available when the mouse hovers over the texts. It is also available when you copy it to the clipboard.
3. I’ve added 3 new buttons: “Select None,” “Select Random,” and “Select All.” These buttons will help to select the language options more quickly.
4. I’ve also fixed some minor bugs that I hadn’t caught before (e.g., -0 is no longer an option, einhundertein is now einhunderteins)

[Note] I’ve noticed that, in Windows XP, the Mandarin text did not display correctly. I’m not sure why that is at the moment. However, when I copied it over to OS X, it worked just fine – so, just know that your data is still preserved.

The new total amount of numbers has gone up to 2,000,020,000,000,010 (that’s 2 quadrillion 20 billion and 10) values. I’ve probably only been able to check a few hundred random numbers. If you catch a mistake somewhere, please let me know! 🙂

Like before, there are 3 versions available (OS X, Windows, and Linux).

For the next version, see Number Writer 2.0. For the previous version, see Number Writer 1.0.
To download, please see the download page. I hope you enjoy the updates! More languages are coming soon!

Number Writer 1.0

To download, please see the download page.
For the next version, see Number Writer 1.1.

In this age of instant online translations, it’s surprising that there’s no good, reliable service to give you translations of numbers. Even if you’re not a mathematician, engineer, or scientist, numbers are still incredibly important in day-to-day life. That’s why I am so frustrated when Google Translate gives me the following translations for, what I believe to be, simple entries:

English to Vietnamese:
positive five becomes tích cực năm (meaning: optimistic five)
negative six becomes tiêu cực sáu (meaning: pessimistic six)
eighteen point six two becomes mười tám điểm sáu hai (meaning: eighteen points [as in score/mark] six two)
English to Italian:
twelve point six two becomes dodici punto sei a due (meaning: twelve point six to two)
English to German:
eleven point six two becomes elf Punkte, sechs zwei (meaning: eleven points, six two)
six point nine two becomes Punkt sechs neun zwei (meaning: point six nine two)
Vietnamese to French:
trừ mười hai (meaning: minus twelve) becomes de douze (meaning: from twelve)
Chinese to English:
funny-english-6-20-12-lung-slice

These translations are truly awful. There’s no reason why they should be this bad. So I’ve set out to make something better: Number Writer.

This program is very self-explanatory. You type in a number and it writes it out for you. Conversely, if you have a series of words that you want to be turned into a number, it’ll do a reverse conversation as well.

In this first version, you’ll have the option of using up to 5 languages: English, French, German, Italian, and Vietnamese.

Some notes:
1. Numbers can be negative or positive.
2. Numbers can be decimal (written with either “.” or “,”)
3. Maximum of 5 numbers after the decimal allowed.
4. Minimum number is -1000000000 (negative one billion).
5. Maximum number is 1000000000 (one billion).
6. No thousand separators are allowed.

Because of the range of numbers allowed, the total array (per language) contains a whopping 200,002,000,000,001 (200 trillion 2 billion and 1) values. Clearly, there is no way I can check all of these numbers. Even if it were possible for me to check each number every second, it would still take me over 6,342,021 years (more than 63.4 thousand centuries) to finish (and more than 317 thousand centuries if I did it for all 5 languages available). Because of this, if you spot a mistake somewhere in the calculations, please let me know and help me improve my algorithms. 🙂

we-can-t-afford-the-cat_262979-460x

As with all other programs I’ve written, there are 3 versions available (OS X, Windows, and Linux). Because there are no graphics and/or colors present, there seems to be no difference from version to version.

For the next version, see Number Writer 1.1.
To download, please see the download page. I hope you enjoy it!

Color Match 1.0

To download, please see the download page.

My inspirations for this game are multifold. The idea first came to me as I recalled a documentary I watched many years ago about climbing Mt. Everest (see the NOVA article about it here). As climbers ascended, they were presented with challenging mental tasks; one of these was the Stroop test (see Wikipedia).

My second inspiration came from a much more recent source: my tablet. 🙂 It came from me playing the game 4 Player Reactor by cool cherry trees. In this game, I was presented with the very same Stroop test. I thought it was very fun, so I set out to make my own version of it.

The game I’ve developed now is called Color Match and it can be described simply as: Stroop test gone wild.

The premise of the game is extremely simple: You are presented with a word that is printed in a certain color. When the name of the color matches the actual font’s color, you click. Get enough right and you win! Get too many wrong before the time runs out and you lose!

In this first version, you’ll have the following options:
1. There are 11 languages: English, French, German, Italian, Korean, Mandarin (Traditional), Mandarin (Simplified), Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese. Each language has 11 colors (but the exact numbers of entries vary because some languages have synonyms for certain colors). (As with all previous games I’ve made, all pronunciation/transliteration guides are available as you hover the mouse over the appropriate languages.)
2. Time can be set to how long (in minutes) the game lasts (minimum is 1, maximum is 60).
3. Time can be set to how long (in seconds) it takes for each new word to appear (minimum is 1, maximum is 60).
4. Points can be set to how many it takes to win (minimum is 1, maximum is 100).
5. There are 10 levels of difficulty: 1 is the easiest (with the correct word/color combination appearing more often) and 10 is the hardest (with the correct word/color combination appearing less often).
6. Number of cards can range from 3 to 15 (in sets of 3). The only reason I’ve made these the constraints was because of screen space.
7. The game counts how many clicks you make and how many buttons go by that were correct. At the end of the game, you’ll see how many you got right compared to how many were possible.

Due to a some sort of bug in Java, there is (once again) some differences between the OS X and Windows versions. The OS X version (.dmg) I run seems to be exactly how I intended it at the moment, the other two file types (.exe and .jar) seem to be suffering from some sort of color distortion (but only when a word is being set for a button that was previously blank). When that is the case, you’ll notice that the word will first be gray, then (in less than a second) changes to the intended color. I am not sure why this happens, because it’s not the code’s fault. Please tolerate this inconvenience and play the OS X version if you can.

To download, please see the download page. I hope you enjoy it!

Memory 2.2

To download, please see the download page.
For the previous version, see Memory 2.1.

This is the second update for the second version. I’ve made a few small changes:
1. I’ve rewritten the error message when the wrong combination of languages and buttons/cards is chosen. Hopefully, it’s now easier to understand.
2. I’ve added a new category: colors. There are now 5 categories total, with each language having 222 entries.

For the previous version, see Memory 2.1.
To download, please see the download page. I hope you will like these changes!