Time Writer 1.1 (Android)

To download, please see the download page.
For the previous version, see Time Writer 1.0.

I’ve made a few small alterations to this app:
1. Both Portuguese (Brazilian) and Portuguese (European) have been combined into one language option: Portuguese. This is because, at least for telling time, there is no difference between the two.
2. When reading the time (written out as words), you can now copy the contents via the options menu. A quick confirmation message will appear to show you what you’ve copied.

For the previous version, see Time Writer 1.0.
To download, please see the download page. I hope you enjoy it!

Time Writer 1.0 (Android)

To download, please see the download page.
For the next version, see Time Writer 1.1.

This is my second Android app and the first to be on its own, not an extension of a PC app that I’ve made. I started making this program to learn how to tell time in different languages. Thanks to the app Number Writer that I’ve made previously, this one came into fruition relatively quickly.

The ability to tell time is something extremely basic that all language learners have to do at one time (pun intended :P) or another. Much like the last program I made, this one came about due to the curious fact that there seems to be no reliable service to give you translations of time. Check out these Google Translate results:

English to Mandarin (Traditional):
It’s twelve sixteen. becomes 這是一二一六年. (Meaning: It is 1216. – this is wrong on 2 levels, because (1) you can’t say “這是” in Chinese for time, and (2) it translated twelve sixteen into the year 1216 and not the time 12:16.)
It is eight nineteen. becomes 這是8點19分. (Meaning: It is 8:19. – like above, it still literally translates “it is” into “這是” and, furthermore, it didn’t write out 8 and 19, leaving the reader unable to say it out loud if he/she can’t read numbers.)
English to Vietnamese:
It’s nine fifteen. becomes Đó là chín mười lăm. (Meaning: That is nine fifteen. – this is wrong on 2 levels, because (1) you can’t say “đó là” in Vietnamese for time, and (2) you can’t say “chín” and “mười lăm” without any time units.)
It is nine fifteen. becomes Là chín mười lăm. (Meaning: Is nine fifteen. – aside from the mistakes pointed out above, a simple removal of the apostrophe yielded an entirely different translation, this is just plain weird.)
English to Portuguese:
It’s six ten. becomes São seis de dez. (Meaning: It’s six of/from ten.)
It is one thirty. becomes É uma meia. (Meaning: It is one half. – should actually be “É uma e meia.”)
English to German:
It’s ten fifteen. becomes Es ist 1015. (Meaning: It is 1015. – like Mandarin, it assumes this is the year and not the time.)
Vietnamese to German:
Bây giờ là sáu giờ hai mươi. (Meaning: It is now six twenty.) becomes Jetzt 26 Stunden. (Meaning: Now 26 hours. – Just… plain wrong.)

These translations are pretty bad, and there’s no reason why they should be so. That’s why I’ve made this new program.

The app itself is very easy to use. You run it and it’ll display the current time (in 24-hour format), with an arc that tells you how far along in the day it is. When you tap the time, it’ll show you the time written out in plain language. You can use the menu to change what language(s) you want to see, and you can use the volume buttons to scroll through your selections.

In this first version, you’ll have 13 language options: English, French, German, Italian, Korean (Hangul), Latvian, Mandarin (Traditional and Simplified), Portuguese (Brazilian and European), Russian (Cyrillic), Spanish, and Vietnamese.

For this app, there are 2 color schemes (light blue on black and dark orange on white). The colors will change automatically depending on the level of ambient lighting.

There’s currently only 1 version of this app, but the good news is that it’s FREE! 🙂 So go check it out!

For the next version, see Time Writer 1.1.
To download, please see the download page. I hope you enjoy it!